Top town dad earns Socio degree

AS A POLITICIAN, Rommel T. Labasan is currently busy attending commencement ceremonies in a number of schools. He is usually a guest of honor and speaker. On April 3, however, it will be his turn to wear a toga and march, this time as a graduate.

Labasan, the number one Sangguniang Bayan member of Pinili town, is one of nine candidates for graduation for the degree Bachelor of Arts in Sociology.

On March 13, the three-term councilor successfully defended his thesis entitled, Perceived Effectiveness of Gender and Development (GAD) programs in Pinili, Ilocos Norte. He was under the advisorship of Herdy Yumul who describes Labasan as “very humble and receptive”. Continue reading “Top town dad earns Socio degree”

More jobs?

There’s a blog dedicated to tackling the burning issue in Laoag City today–the construction of a mall that will force the demolition of a heritage school.   http://laoagcentralissue.wordpress.com

What follows is a couple of  interviews with Laoag City folks on the issue of job generation.

Will the mall project really generate the around-1000 jobs it promises?  What kind of employment will it offer?  Short-term, contractual jobs?

What do you think, karikna?

Budding Sociologists tackle the laoagcentralissue

 

Young Ilocano Sociologists at work
Young Ilocano Sociologists at work

INSTEAD of submitting tired academic papers, my students in Sociology of Development are working on a blog (http://laoagcentralissue.wordpress.com).

Using the sociological lens, the blog tackles the complex issues that surround the construction of a mall in downtown Laoag.

My students’ zest in posting entries there is fueled not only of their aspirations for high marks, but more so of their desire to generate intelligent and enlightened discussion on the implications of the mall project to development.

Continue reading “Budding Sociologists tackle the laoagcentralissue”

The Powerless Academic

I feel like a prostitute, used and not taken seriously, unimportant and powerless, paid for some passing need. This is how a few years in the academe has made me feel.

Thousands of Nursing students have attended my classes, and they have come in various shapes and forms: young, not so young, married, single, well-off, poor. They have one common goal: to leave this country as soon as possible.

Ask them why they took the course, and they are quick to tell you success stories of their relatives in other countries, and the dim tomorrow that awaits us in our own. These students are well-driven, and well-motivated. Charity begins at home. And so are apathy, resignation, and materialism. Any influence that I wield as an educator is very easily negated by the gospel of a world that is painfully real. Continue reading “The Powerless Academic”