Notes from Aurora Park

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Photo by blauearth (http://blauearth.com)
Photo by skyblue/Ritchelle Blanco dejolde
Photo by skyblue/Ritchelle Blanco dejolde
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Photo by blauearth (http://blauearth.com)
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photo by blauearth (http://blauearth.com)
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photo by Blauearth (http://blauearth.com)
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photo by blauearth (http://blauearth.com)
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Katrina Valera-Mandac (photo by blauearth  http://blauearth.com)
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Ilocos Allstar (photo by blauearth http://blauearth.com)
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Emil Tanagon (photo by blauearth http://blauearth.com)

LJC

University students (photo by blauearth http://blauearth.com)
University students (photo by blauearth http://blauearth.com)
Steve Barreiro (photo by Blauearth http://blauearth.com)
Steve Barreiro (photo by Blauearth http://blauearth.com)
Bikers unite! Rex Alejandro (photo by blauearth http://blauearth.com
Bikers unite! Rex Alejandro (photo by blauearth http://blauearth.com
Lady Jaja Colleen
Lady Jaja Colleen

“Parmeken ti kinababoy, ibalud dagiti birkog!”

That, dear karikna, was the cry of hundreds of Ilocanos who joined the anti-pork barrel gathering held at the Aurora Freedom Park last Monday, Aug. 26. Dubbed as the Pork O’Clock March, the gathering drew representatives from various sectors to peacefully but loudly express indignation against mammoth government corruption. Incidentally, this rally for the abolition of the pork barrel was staged near the monument marking the abolition of the tobacco monopoly in 1882.

Like the Million People March in Luneta and other protest activities around the country, the Laoag event did not have any organizers, only facilitators. I and a couple of other writers met Friday, three days before the event, to talk about how the Ilocano voice can be heard in what was already looming as a nationwide day of protest. We in this part of the country are often perceived as passive on issues, but no, not this time, we said. We know that Ilocanos are as furious as the rest of our countrymen, only that there is no avenue where we could express our collective fury. Continue reading “Notes from Aurora Park”