Romantic first pot

Reacting to the article ‘Legalize Marijuana’, my friend Mars of Kalinga Province, sent me this piece detailing about his first encounter with marijuana. ***kilig mode***

The summer vacation before school began for our fourth year in high school… Hector (a childhood friend) and I spent a lazy afternoon by the river. He was talking about the future – his future – and how impatient he was to get there.

I listened, like I always did. We were sitting on a rock, and our eyes were fixed on the rushing water below us, but I simply drowned out the sound of the shallow water as I concentrated on what Hector was saying.

I noticed that he was rather more focused that afternoon. Calm.

Then he reached into his pocket and brought out what then looked, for me, to be a crudely rolled cigarette. I asked what it was and he said “I smoked MJ for the first time this morning, and I thought I might share it with you… it felt good, and you might want to try it.”

I simply stared at the joint he was beginning to light with a match. Then, he brought the other end to his lips, palms forming an enclave around the stick. He inhaled. Deep. Eyes closed. Moments passed before he exhaled, and out went some smoke.

“That is, if you want to…” he said, as he opened his eyes and saw me watching intently.

Hector and I grew up together. We shared a lot of things, and he never even gave a damn that I was, well, “different.” Not wanting things to change (knowing that upon graduating from high school, we would grow apart as he would pursue a totally different field), I smiled at him, placed my hands over his, gently took the red-tipped joint from him, and recorded that day as the first time I smoked pot.

An hour later, we were still talking… with him gazing at the horizon… and me, studying the movements of the clouds above as I had my head resting on his lap.

Every time I transport myself back to that day and again feel what I felt then – river, rocks, clouds, future, Hector – I feel like I could write a book about just that episode.

Spare us, please.

Is it possible for our Sangguniang Panlalawigan to pass a resolution urging national government to exempt Ilocos from EDSA commemorations? The best thing, of course, is to scrap EDSA remembrances altogether as people are now beginning to rethink its real importance, if it has any at all.

Where have we been 23 years after EDSA I? Are we a truly-free, progressive, and united people? Or did we jump out of the pan and into the fire?

Why should we, Ilocanos, celebrate something we largely regard as an error?

Any legislator who will sponsor a measure along this line has my respect… and my vote.